Applied Conservation Lab

Mission Statement & Purpose

The Millersville Applied Conservation Lab is an interdisciplinary lab which consists mainly of undergraduate research projects being conducted by Millersville University biology students.  The mission statement of the Lab is ‘The study and development of applied solutions to conservation problems through the efforts of undergraduate research'.  The Director of the Applied Conservation Lab is Dr. Aaron Haines.  The lab is currently located in 116 Caputo Hall at The Millersville University campus. Current equipment available to aid undergraduate students in developing solutions to conservation problems include: infrared remote cameras, small mammal traps, chemical soil testing kits, GPS units, wildlife telemetry equipment, centrifuge, drying oven and forensic testing kits.    

Click below to review some of the Lab's projects, accomplishments and activities:

Trap Line

Benefits of Undergraduate Research and Service Learning

Undergraduate students that have been exposed to research and service learning early in their college careers have been shown to increase their basic scientific inquiry skills which increases their sense of professionalism as a scientist.  In addition, undergraduate research and service learning has been shown to increase student graduation success, especially in underrepresented minorities and students with low GPAs. Also, participation in research and service increases a students's interest in science careers and graduate study.  Other benefits include:

  • Gain hands-on experience 
  • Have opportunities to act on your values and beliefs
  • Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills
  • Learn more about social issues and communities
  • Improve your ability to become more flexible
  • Develop skills in the areas of communication, collaboration, and leadership
  • Test out your skills, interests, and values in a potential career path
  • Connect with professionals and community members who you will learn from

(http://www.servicelearning.umn.edu)