Peer Educator Programs

Peer Education Programs

The Peer Educators offer a variety of awareness programs for the University community.  These are interactive presentations that can be presented to resident halls, athletic teams, fraternities, sororities, clubs, or other organizations.
The programs (each approximately 1 hour in length) include:

Alcohol and Other Drugs:
A Shot of Reality:  A discussion about the use of alcohol on campus.  Students learn risk reduction strategies as well as ways to avoid social pressures.  Additionally, students learn the signs of alcohol poisoning and how the law plays a role.
Chasing that First High: An interactive program on substance abuse and addiction.  Students are provided with updated information about drugs that may be used by college students, will learn skills to recognize if someone has an addiction or is abusing drugs and where to find help on campus and in the community.
Sex Goes to the Movies: This program uses popular movie clips to educate participants about risky and unsafe partying, alcohol consumption, consent, and how to make healthy personal decisions.
Wasted Safety: Interactive program discussing alcohol poisoning, alcoholism, and ways to intervene as a bystander.

Body and Mind:
Conquering College: This program identifies major stressors students may face during their time in college and the resources on campus available to them. Students will learn different stress management techniques that will become useful to them during their college experience.
Minding Your Mind: This program is designed to provide students with knowledge on good mental health practices and how to identify and address common mental health concerns. Students will learn the difference between depression, anxiety, and stress and how daily actions may influence mental health positively or negatively.
Not Fooling Me: This program exposes the media's portrayal of body image and the impact it has on young adults and ways to improve self-image.

Choices Student-Athlete Program:
Alcohol Awareness: The Choices student-athletes work with the NCAA and club sports on campus to provide alcohol awareness educational programming.  Contact us for additional information on what the peer educators can bring to your organization.

Greek Life Peer Educators:
Peer educators who are currently members of a fraternity or sorority on campus offer educational programming to their fellow Greek Life organizations on alcohol and sexual assault.   Contact us for additional information on what the Greek Life peer educators can bring to your organization.

Sexual Responsibility/Healthy Relationships:
Rubberware Party: A fun and interactive way to discuss contraception and their role in safer sex practices.
Sex & Chocolate: This question and answer session provides an opportunity to openly talk about relationships and to ask questions about sex and relationships.
Keepin' It REALtionships: Actively discusses various types of intimate relationships.  Students discuss healthy and unhealthy aspects of relationships and learn to effectively communicate with current and future partners.
STI BingoAn interactive game of bingo to teach students about sexually transmitted infections.

Karlies Angels:

Getting Down in the Green: This program is aimed at raising awareness about sexual assault and the Red Zone (the time starting on the first day on campus until the first break when students are at an increased risk of being sexually assaulted). The program provides information about bystander intervention and ways to intervene in a potentially risky situation, provides information on available resources on and off campus and how to help a friend if victimized, reporting procedures, identifies the dangers of the red zone, and discussions around victim blaming.
Red Flags: This program focuses on dating and domestic violence through providing information on the signs of healthy vs. unhealthy relationships and the red flag indicators of dating abuse, and well as helping students know available resources on and off campus.
Escalation: From the One Love Foundation, this program includes a film that illuminates the warning signs of an unhealthy and potentially dangerous relationship followed by a discussion about relationships, how to identify warning signs in unhealthy relationships, and how to be an active bystander (90 minutes).
Sex Goes to the Movies: This program uses popular movie clips to educate participants about risky and unsafe partying, alcohol consumption, consent, and how to make healthy personal decisions.

  • campus.  Students learn risk reduction strategies as well as ways to avoid social pressures.  Additionally, students learn the signs of alcohol poisoning and how the law plays a role.
    Chasing that First High: An interactive program on substance abuse and addiction.  Students learn skills on how to recognize if someone has an issue with drugs and where to find help on campus.Sex Goes to the Movies: This program uses popular movie clips to educate participants about risky and unsafe partying, alcohol consumption, consent, and how to avoid these risky situations.

  • News You Can Use:

    On college campuses across the country Alcohol is the #1 date rape drug.  Most of us know that impairment begins with the first drink, yet some of us mistakenly believe that being sexual with someone that has had one or two drinks is date rape.  That is not necessarily true.  So, when does incapacitation begin?  And how do you know that you gave or have consent, anyway?

    Incapacitation is when you can’t make a rational, reasonable decision and can’t give knowing consent.  For example, what if someone is staggering, slurring their words and repeating themselves but they say they “want you bad.” It’s OK, right?  Nope! The person is not capable of giving consent. This is textbook sexual assault and happens far too often on college campuses.

    Consent is clear, knowing and voluntary.  It is active, not passive.  Silence is not consent. Whether it is in words or actions you both communicate that all systems are go for sexual behavior.  And remember, just because you receive consent for intercourse once, that does not imply permission to have sex in the future or for bondage or any other sexual activity.  And what if someone consents to sex and then changes their mind?  No Sex for You!

    Many sexual assaults involving incapacitation take place where other

    students see what is happening, yet say nothing.  These “bystanders” have far more power than they realize. When we intervene by taking an incapacitated person safely back to their residence or challenge our friend about their date’s inability to give consent, we make a difference… a big difference! 

    If you want to know more, contact our wonderful and knowledgeable folks at the Center for Health Education and Promotion (CHEP) at chep@millersville.edu or (717) 871-4141.  To read more about MU policies relating to sexual assault and consent, check out the Office of Judicial Affairs student handbook found online at: www.millersville.edu/judicialaffairs.

     

    News You Can Use:

    On college campuses across the country Alcohol is the #1 date rape drug.  Most of us know that impairment begins with the first drink, yet some of us mistakenly believe that being sexual with someone that has had one or two drinks is date rape.  That is not necessarily true.  So, when does incapacitation begin?  And how do you know that you gave or have consent, anyway?

     

    Incapacitation is when you can’t make a rational, reasonable decision and can’t give knowing consent.  For example, what if someone is staggering, slurring their words and repeating themselves but they say they “want you bad.” It’s OK, right?  Nope! The person is not capable of giving consent. This is textbook sexual assault and happens far too often on college campuses.

    Consent is clear, knowing and voluntary.  It is active, not passive.  Silence is not consent. Whether it is in words or actions you both communicate that all systems are go for sexual behavior.  And remember, just because you receive consent for intercourse once, that does not imply permission to have sex in the future or for bondage or any other sexual activity.  And what if someone consents to sex and then changes their mind?  No Sex for You!

    Many sexual assaults involving incapacitation take place where other students see what is happening, yet say nothing.  These “bystanders” have far more power than they realize. When we intervene by taking an incapacitated person safely back to their residence or challenge our friend about their date’s inability to give consent, we make a difference… a big difference! 

    If you want to know more, contact our wonderful and knowledgeable folks at the Center for Health Education and Promotion (CHEP) at chep@millersville.edu or (717) 871-4141.  To read more about MU policies relating to sexual assault and consent, check out the Office of Judicial Affairs student handbook found online at: www.millersville.edu/judicialaffairs.

     

    News You Can Use:

    On college campuses across the country Alcohol is the #1 date rape drug.  Most of us know that impairment begins with the first drink, yet some of us mistakenly believe that being sexual with someone that has had one or two drinks is date rape.  That is not necessarily true.  So, when does incapacitation begin?  And how do you know that you gave or have consent, anyway?

     

    Incapacitation is when you can’t make a rational, reasonable decision and can’t give knowing consent.  For example, what if someone is staggering, slurring their words and repeating themselves but they say they “want you bad.” It’s OK, right?  Nope! The person is not capable of giving consent. This is textbook sexual assault and happens far too often on college campuses.

    Consent is clear, knowing and voluntary.  It is active, not passive.  Silence is not consent. Whether it is in words or actions you both communicate that all systems are go for sexual behavior.  And remember, just because you receive consent for intercourse once, that does not imply permission to have sex in the future or for bondage or any other sexual activity.  And what if someone consents to sex and then changes their mind?  No Sex for You!

    Many sexual assaults involving incapacitation take place where other students see what is happening, yet say nothing.  These “bystanders” have far more power than they realize. When we intervene by taking an incapacitated person safely back to their residence or challenge our friend about their date’s inability to give consent, we make a difference… a big difference! 

    If you want to know more, contact our wonderful and knowledgeable folks at the Center for Health Education and Promotion (CHEP) at chep@millersville.edu or (717) 871-4141.  To read more about MU policies relating to sexual assault and consent, check out the Office of Judicial Affairs student handbook found online at: www.millersville.edu/judicialaffairs.

     

    News You Can Use:


    On college campuses across the country Alcohol is the #1 date rape drug.  Most of us know that impairment begins with the first drink, yet some of us mistakenly believe that being sexual with someone that has had one or two drinks is date rape.  That is not necessarily true.  So, when does incapacitation begin?  And how do you know that you gave or have consent, anyway?

     

    Incapacitation is when you can’t make a rational, reasonable decision and can’t give knowing consent.  For example, what if someone is staggering, slurring their words and repeating themselves but they say they “want you bad.” It’s OK, right?  Nope! The person is not capable of giving consent. This is textbook sexual assault and happens far too often on college campuses.

    Consent is clear, knowing and voluntary.  It is active, not passive.  Silence is not consent. Whether it is in words or actions you both communicate that all systems are go for sexual behavior.  And remember, just because you receive consent for intercourse once, that does not imply permission to have sex in the future or for bondage or any other sexual activity.  And what if someone consents to sex and then changes their mind?  No Sex for You!

    Many sexual assaults involving incapacitation take place where other students see what is happening, yet say nothing.  These “bystanders” have far more power than they realize. When we intervene by taking an incapacitated person safely back to their residence or challenge our friend about their date’s inability to give consent, we make a difference… a big difference! 

    If you want to know more, contact our wonderful and knowledgeable folks at the Center for Health Education and Promotion (CHEP) at chep@millersville.edu or (717) 871-4141.  To read more about MU policies relating to sexual assault and consent, check out the Office of Judicial Affairs student handbook found online at: www.millersville.edu/judicialaffairs.

     

    End the Violence: This program focuses broader on sexual misconduct and includes information on dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking.  The program engages participants in an activity to increase their knowledge of violence along a continuum, helps individuals understand the role of being an active bystander and how to potentially intervene, and the available resources (including reporting) for students who are victimized.
    Calling Men to Action: This men-only program embraces the help and courage of men in ending sexual assault as gender violence isn't just a women's issue.  This program seeks to motivate men to be involved in ending sexual assault, engages participants in role plays to understand consent, helps participants brainstorm ways that men can be involved in ending sexual assault, provides participants with information on available resources on and off campus and how to help a friend if victimized and reporting procedures. 
    In the Green: Red Zone Awareness: This program is aimed at raising awareness about sexual assault and the Red Zone (the time starting on the first day on campus until the first break when students are at an increased risk of being sexually assaulted. The program provides information about bystander intervention and ways on how to intervene in a potentially risky situation, provides information on available resources on and off campus and how to help a friend if victimized, reporting procedures, identifies the dangers of the red zone, and discussions around victim blaming.
    Got Consent: This programs purpose is to increase the knowledge of sexual assault and understanding about consent. Information is presented to raise awareness of sexual assault and consent. This program discusses the Red Zone as well as resources (including reporting) available on and off campus for victims of sexual violence.
    Sex Goes to the Movies: This program uses popular movie clips to educate participants about risky and unsafe partying, alcohol consumption, consent, how to avoid potentially risky situations, and resources available on and off campus.

Program Request Procedures

To request a peer education program, please complete the online request form:  Fill out online

When requesting a program:

  • Please provide us with a minimum of 2 weeks notice.
  • We do not present programs on Wednesday evenings between 9pm and 10:30pm due to our weekly meeting.
  • After requesting a program, expect to receive an email response within 3 business days (with the exception of holidays and breaks) indicating that your request was received.
  • You will receive a program confirmation via email within a business week (with the exception of holidays and breaks) after requesting the program unless noted otherwise by the student manager.
  • Please respond to the email confirmation within 3 days indicating that everything is set for the program.

Email: pestudentmanager@millersville.edu
Tel: 717-871-4134