Student Profile

Justin Egresitz

Justin Egresitz

Major: Technology and Engineering Education


Class Year: 2018
Hometown: Lebanon, PA

Additional Information

Internships/Research/Projects:

I am currently an intern in the Professional Development School (PDS) program at a local high school in an Intro to Information Technology class. I also spend time in the Woods laboratory in Osburn Hall, experimenting with Computer Numeric Control (CNC) technology with Dr. Alex Johnson.

Inspirations:

I am inspired by the wonderful faculty in the Applied Engineering, Safety, and Technology department. Their wealth of knowledge, compassion, and support have enabled a personal and professional growth in me that leaves me unendingly grateful for their employment. They are the reason that I call Osburn home.

Highlights:

-Induction into Epsilon Pi Tau, the international honors society for professions in technology

-Receiving the Class of 1954 Endowment from Millersville University

-Working with a class of special needs students and helping them to produce a wooden tic-tac-toe game and develop real-world skills.

Takeaway:

The biggest take away I have is how crucial empathy is. As an educator, citizen, and human being, I feel having a sense of the world around you and what someone else may have on their plate is so integral to communication, and having a positive impact on the world around you.

Advice:

Sit in the front row of every class and be a sponge. A college education affords you so much more than rote knowledge, if you take advantage of your opportunities and find the meanings behind your lessons.

Aspirations:

After graduation, I will be pursuing a Master's degree in Innovation and Technology from the Applied Engineering, Safety, and Technology Department. My long-term goals are to complete a doctoral program and become a professor here at Millersville.

What has been the most significant/exciting aspect of your work?

The most significant and exciting aspect of my work has been the expansion of my own capabilities and seeing the "Ah-Ha!" moment that students have when they understand a concept they are attempting to master.