Dr. Eric J. Ryndock

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY, Foundations of Biology, Cell & Developmental Biology, Virology

Dr. Eric J. Ryndock

Contact Information

eric.ryndock@millersville.edu

Office: Caputo 201
Phone: 717-871-4291

Office Hours

Comments: Due the COVID-19 pandemic, faculty office hours will be conducted remotely. Please send your brief questions by email. For more extensive discussions, use email to set-up a phone or Zoom appointment

EDUCATION:

B.S. in Biology, Millersville University
Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology, The Pennsylvania State University


COURSES TAUGHT:

BIOL 101 – Foundations of Biology, Lecture and Lab
BIOL 108H – Honors: Freshman Biology Seminar
BIOL 362 – Cell and Developmental Biology, Lab


AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION:

Virology, Immunology, Medical Microbiology, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology


RESEARCH INTEREST(S):

My interests encompass understanding the world of viruses. Although viruses themselves are not considered “alive,” viruses infect all living organisms. You may not be able to see them, but viruses are everywhere! We ingest viruses, their genetic material is part of our genomes, and viruses are a major driver of biological evolution. I am most interested in deciphering molecular mechanisms of viruses and designing methodologies to detect them in our environment.


SELECTED PUBLICATION(S): (Add “*” for those done with a STUDENT)

Meyers C, Israr M, Biryukov J, Ryndock E, and Alam S. 2016. Comparison of human papillomavirus type 16 replication in tonsil and foreskin epithelia. Virology. 499: 82-90. PMID: 27639574

Ryndock EJ, Robison R, and Meyers C. 2016. Susceptibility of HPV16 and 18 to high level disinfectants indicated for semi-critical ultrasound probes. Journal of Medical Virology. 88(6): 1076-80. PMID: 26519866

Ryndock EJ, Biryukov J, and Meyers C. 2015. Replication of human papillomavirus in culture. Cervical Cancer: Methods and Protocols. Methods in Molecular Biology. 1249:39-52. PMID: 25348296

Biryukov J, Cruz L, Ryndock EJ, and Meyers C. 2015. Native human papillomavirus production, quantification, and infectivity analysis. Cervical Cancer: Methods and Protocols. Methods in Molecular Biology. 1249:317-331. PMID: 25348296

Ryndock EJ and Meyers C. 2014. A risk for non-sexual transmission of human papillomavirus? Expert Review Anti-Infective Therapy. 12(10):1165-70. PMID: 25199987

Meyers J, Ryndock EJ, Conway MJ, Meyers C, and Robison R. 2014. The susceptibility of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 to clinical disinfectants. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. 69(6):1546-50. PMID: 24500190

Ryndock EJ, Conway MJ, Alam S, Gul S, Murad S, Christensen ND, and Meyers C. 2014. Roles for human papillomavirus type 16 L1 cysteine residues 161, 229, and 379 in genome encapsidation and capsid stability. PLOS One. 9(6):e99488. PMID: 24918586

Alam S, Bowser BS, Conway MJ, Israr M, Ryndock EJ, Xi LF, and Meyers C. 2010. Downregulation of Cdc2/CDK1 kinase activity induces the synthesis of noninfectious human papillomavirus 31b virions in organotypic tissues exposed to benzo[a]pyrene. Journal of Virology. 84(9):4630-4645. PMID: 20181698

Conway MJ, Alam, S, Ryndock EJ, Cruz L, Christensen ND, Roden RB, and Meyers C. 2009. Tissue-spanning redox gradient-dependent assembly of native human papillomavirus type 16 virions. Journal of Virology. 83(20): 10515-10526. PMID: 19656879